Friday, August 28, 2015

Tyler anti-government terrorist cyanide poison gas plot

Tyler anti-government terrorist cyanide poison gas plot ---

3 arrested Apr 15, 2003 Tyler anti-government terrorist cyanide poison gas plot  merican attempt at domestic terrorism thwarted in April 2003 with the arrest of three individuals in Tyler, Texas and the seizure of a cyanide gas bomb along with a large arsenal that included at least 100 other conventional bombs, machine guns, an assault rifle, an unregistered silencer, and 500,000 rounds of ammunition. There were 65 pipe bombs, and briefcase IED bombs that could be detonated by remote control. The chemical stockpile seized included sodium cyanide, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid and acetic acid.
The three individuals were linked to white supremacist and anti-government groups

Similar: In 1997, the Dallas FBI broke up a terror plot by members of the Ku Klux Klan to blow up a Wise County power plant.

tags:

  • Anarchist Cookbook terrorist book
  • Anti-black
  • Anti-semitic
  • Arms sales
  • Assorted Nasties terrorist book
  • Turner Diaries (also associated with Oklahoma City bombers)
  • Assault rifle
  • Militia movement
  • New Hampshire
  • Pipe bomb
  • Poor Man's James Bond
  • Racist 
  • Right Wing Extremist
  • Silencer 
  • Texas
  • White supremacist


*Sources


Tyler poison gas plot - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyler_poison_gas_plot
Tyler poison gas plot
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Tyler poison gas plot was an American attempt at domestic terrorism thwarted in April 2003 with the arrest of three individuals inTyler, Texas and the seizure of a cyanide gas bomb along with a large arsenal that included at least 100 other conventional bombs, ; more than 25 machine guns, rifles and pistols; including an assault rifle, an unregistered silencer, and 500,000 rounds of ammunition.[1][2] The chemical stockpile seized includedsodium cyanide, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid and acetic acid.[1] Literature included Anti-black, anti-Semitic, and antigovernment literature was found. The most disturbing were the books on how to make bombs and chemical weapons such as The Anarchist Cookbook, The Poor Man's James Bond, Turner Diaries (also associated with Oklahoma City bombers) and Assorted Nasties.

The three individuals were linked to white supremacist and anti-government groups. They were:[1]
William J. Krar, originally from New Hampshire
Judith Bruey, Krar's common-law wife
Edward Feltus of Old Bridge, New Jersey

Feltus was a member of the New Jersey Militia. Krar was suspected of making his living travelling across the country selling bomb components and other weapons to violent underground anti-government groups.[1]

1985:  His arrest record dated back to 1985, when he was found guilty of impersonating a police officer. It was also discovered that Krar had not filed federal income taxes since 1988.

New Hampshire: employee with another New Hampshire storage facility Krar stored items in described him as “wicked anti-American,” an affidavit states. “She said Krar used to say things to her such as the United States government was corrupt and he hated the United States government and all of the cops,” court documents state. Before Krar moved to Texas, federal agents in New Hampshire noticed known militia members frequenting his business.


LaRocca said Krar was holding militia meetings there. But on cross-examination, LaRocca said Krar's relations with militia member may be related to business since they are usually associated with the purchase of weapons.

1988: Although agents monitoring a mailbox rented by Krar’s employee found legitimate business transactions being made, the defendant hasn’t reported an income to the Internal Revenue Service since 1988, LaRocca said.

Federal authorities had their eye on Krar since at least 1995 when ATF agents investigated a possible plot to bomb government buildings, but Krar was not charged.[2] In 1995, antigovernment activist Sean Bottoms was arrested in Tennessee with a large number of firearms, ammunition and bomb-making materials. Also found at the time was Krar's business card. As a result, FBI agents began to monitor Krar and IDC America, which was then in Manchester, N.H. 

1999: Moved to Texas Authorities found discrepancies in Krar's story and a history of suspicious behavior. Krar had never had a federal firearms license. Nor did he have a Texas driver's license though he'd lived in the state for two years.

June 2001: June 2001 a fire broke out at the storage facility in New Hampshire where Krar and Bruey were then storing their goods. The fire department was forced to break in to one of their lockers. Inside they discovered thousands of rounds of ammunition and four firearms, one of which was a modified automatic rifle.

2001: , on the day of the 9-11 terrorist attacks, Krar raised suspicion at a New Hampshire storage unit he was renting. An employee called the FBI that day and reported that Krar was “wicked anti-American.”

In January 2002, Krar mailed a package of documents — including fake United Nations and Defense Intelligence Agency ID cards, a social security card, and birth certificates from three states — to Edward Feltus, 56, a self-described member of the New Jersey Militia. It was mistakenly delivered to a man in New York who, upon opening it, notified the authorities of its suspicious contents.

Since the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, their attention was focused on middle-eastern terrorist activities and were only alerted to Krar's recent activities by accident when he mailed Feltus a package of counterfeit birth certificates from North Dakota, Vermont and West Virginia, and United Nations Multinational Force and Defence Intelligence Agency IDs.[2] The package was mistakenly delivered to a Staten Island man who alerted police.[1]

Authorities began watching the Tyler mailbox used by Krar after a package allegedly intended for a New Jersey militia member landed in other person’s hands.

Jan 2003 Suspicious activity involving Krar has been noticed by officers around the country.  A Tennessee state trooper found atropine injections, a nerve gas antidote, on Krar when the defendant was arrested in January.  Marijuana, various weapons, a false birth certificate and credit card issued to “William Franco” also were found in his rental car.

 In January 2003, a year after his package was intercepted, Krar was pulled over by a state trooper in Tennessee. In Krar's rented vehicle, troopers found three military-style atropine injections, used as an antidote for several kinds of nerve gas; 16 knives; a stun gun; a smoke grenade; two handguns; handcuffs; seven marijuana cigarettes; and 41 bottles and a syringe containing unknown substances. 

Also found were the series of notes that appeared to outline some kind of plot — notes that Krar claimed were actually a plan to help his girlfriend escape her abusive husband.

told  federal authorities he was the CEO of International Development Corp., or IDC America, a company that manufactures gun parts. He claimed the guns, a 9mm and a .22 handgun, were his own but denied knowledge of the other items. He said he hadn't sold firearms because his federal firearms license expired. Shortly after his Tennessee arrest, Krar posted bond and was free to go.

Authorities found discrepancies in Krar's story and a history of suspicious behavior. Krar had never had a federal firearms license. Nor did he have a Texas driver's license though he'd lived in the state for two years.
(spl)

 April 10, 2003, search Chemicals found during the included containers of hydrochloric, nitric, and acetic acids, as well as the military-grade cyanide.
Krar unearthed multiple containers of chemicals and prompted local officials to contact agents in Washington, D.C. Authorities believe they found nitric acid in the storage unit. A package labeled sodium cyanide and several other chemicals could not be positively identified, said FBI Special Agent Bart LaRocca. Sodium cyanide could be mixed with acid to produce a deadly gas, he said

prosecutors turned up a series of cryptic documents that appeared to detail some type of covert plan. There were elaborate secret codes, a list of nine cities designated as "meeting places," what appeared to be a to-do list, and notes about fake ID

On May 4, 2004 Krar was sentenced to 135 months in prison after he pled guilty to building and possessing chemical weapons. Ms. Bruey was sentenced to 57 months after pleading to "conspiracy to possess illegal weapons." [3]


As per a lookup at the BOP prisoner database on September 18, 2012, Mr. Krar is listed as deceased, [4] Ms. Bruey was released in May 2008 ,[5] and no information is available for Edward Feltus.
References[edit]

^ Jump up to:a b c d e Riggs, Robert (Nov 26, 2003). "WMD Plot Uncovered In East Texas".
^ Jump up to:a b c "Feds: What did Texas couple plan to do with cyanide?". USA Today. January 30, 2004.
Jump up^ "US DOJ: PRISON SENTENCE FOR POSSESSING CHEMICAL WEAPONS" (PDF). May 4, 2004.
Jump up^ http://www.bop.gov/iloc2/InmateFinderServlet?Transaction=NameSearch&needingMoreList=false&FirstName=william&Middle=j.&LastName=krar&Race=U&Sex=M&Age=&x=71&y=15
Jump up^ http://www.bop.gov/iloc2/InmateFinderServlet?Transaction=NameSearch&needingMoreList=false&FirstName=judith&Middle=&LastName=bruey&Race=U&Sex=F&Age=&x=52&y=10
External links[edit]
"The US Terrorism Plot That the Media Ignores". The Memory Hole.
"The terror threat at home, often overlooked". The Christian Science Monitor.
"Case Yields Chilling Signs of Domestic Terror Plot". Los Angeles Times. January 7, 2004.
WMD Plot in East Texas: CBS 11 Investigates Poison Gas Plot
www.informationclearinghouse.info/article5...
Information Clearing HouseNov 26, 2003 - Since arresting the three people in May, federal agents have served ...this past Spring was Newark, New Jersey resident Edward Feltus.
According to a more recent FBI affidavit, on the day of the 9-11 terrorist attacks, Krar raised suspicion at a New Hampshire storage unit he was renting. An employee called the FBI that day and reported that Krar was “wicked anti-American.”

The terror threat at home, often overlooked - CSMonitor.com
www.csmonitor.com/.../p02s01-usju.html
The Christian Science MonitorDec 29, 2003 - Krar and his common-law wife, Judith Bruey, and the receiver of the package, New Jersey Militia member Edward Feltus, were arrested.

FBI — Preventing Terrorist Attacks on U.S. Soil
https://www.fbi.gov/news/.../krar040904
Federal Bureau of InvestigationApr 9, 2004 - The addressee, Edward Feltus, was a member of the New Jersey militia who had his ... All three were arrested in the spring of 2003 after a joint ...
Preventing Terrorist Attacks on U.S. Soil
The Case of the Wrong Package Falling into the Right Hands

04/09/04

krarh.jpgIt began with a misdelivered package.

Inside it were half a dozen fake identification documents—birth certificates from three states, a social security card, Defense Intelligence Agency and United Nations ID cards—all in different names, but with the same picture. And a note: "Hope this package gets to you O.K., we would hate to have this fall into the wrong hands."

Luckily, it fell into what we'd call the right hands. The New York resident who mistakenly received the package notified police, who called in the FBI.

The return address led to a Texas man, William Krar, and his longtime companion, Judith Bruey. Turned out that trafficking in phony IDs was just the iceberg tip of their illegal activities.

What did agents find stashed in three storage lockers the pair had rented? Lots of sodium cyanide and other chemicals, instructions on how to combine them to make deadly poison gases; more than 25 machine guns, rifles and pistols; over 250,000 rounds of ammunition; and various kinds of explosives. At their home, agents found more guns, chemicals, and blank fake ID cards.

Who were these people? The couple, who owned a company that made gun parts, had ties to members of the anti-government "militia movement" in New England. The addressee, Edward Feltus, was a member of the New Jersey militia who had his own cache of weapons stored at his Vermont "safe house."

All three were arrested in the spring of 2003 after a joint investigation by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, the Army Criminal Investigation Division, the Defense Department Criminal Investigative Service, and the FBI's Dallas, Boston and Newark offices. They have since pled guilty—Mr. Krar to possessing a dangerous chemical weapon; Ms. Bruey to conspiracy to possess illegal weapons; and Mr. Feltus to aiding and abetting the transportation of false IDs. They are scheduled to be sentenced next month.

The investigation continues as FBI field offices around the country are questioning associates of the trio to determine whether their activities were part of a broader terrorist plot.

How prevalent are cases of "domestic terrorism"? You may be surprised. Domestic terrorism cases have nearly doubled over the past five years, from almost 3,500 in 1999 to more than 6,000 in 2003.

Our Enemies at Home - NYTimes.com
www.nytimes.com/2003/12/13/opinion/13LEVI.html
The New York TimesDec 13, 2003 - ... Mr. Krar's companion, and Edward Feltus, a member of a parmilitary... In February, federal officials arrested Rafael Davila, a former Army ...

Man arrested with small army of weapons, page 1
www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread30313/pg1
Jan 21, 2004 - 15 posts - ‎12 authors"Without question, it ranks at the very top of all domestic terror arrest in the ... and a New Jersey Militia member Edward Feltus, were arrested.

2003 - Citizens Crime Commission
www.nycrimecommission.org/domestic-terrorism-2003.php
Edward Feltus, ... Authorities arrested the men as a preventative measure after monitoring their communications and learning of their interest in terrorist activities.

NH TP Domestic Terrorist dies in prison - Quatloos!
ww.quatloos.com/Q-Forum/viewtopic.php?t=4229
May 7, 2009 - Three antigovernment activists were rounded up: Edward Feltus, 56, ...almost no national news coverage when Krar was arrested and pled ...

Homegrown Terrorists — FAIR
fair.org/extra-online-articles/homegrown-terrorists/
... went astray on its way to New Jersey militia member Edward Feltus. The accidental recipient alerted the FBI, leading to the arrest of Krar, Bruey and Feltus in ...

Cyanide Bomb Found in Texas Owned by Racist, Anti ...
https://www.splcenter.org/.../cyanide-bomb...
Southern Poverty Law CenterApr 20, 2004 - ... card, and birth certificates from three states — to Edward Feltus, 56,... Shortly after his Tennessee arrest, Krar posted bond and was free to ...It would be more than six months before a federal raid there that turned up 800 grams of nearly pure sodium cyanide ready to be fashioned into a deadly bomb, a "huge arsenal of military-style weapons," and tantalizing suggestions of a terrorist plot concocted by members of the American radical right, received more than a passing mention. The cyanide bomb was almost ready to go. If it had been used, authorities say it was powerful enough to kill everyone in a 30,000-square-foot building in minutes — a weapon of mass destruction reminiscent of the Oklahoma City bombing.

William Krar, 63, and his common-law wife Judith Bruey, 54, had stockpiled a cache of military weapons in three rented storage units in rural East Texas. The cache included a half a million rounds of ammunition, more than 60 pipe bombs, machine guns, silencers, and remote-controlled bombs disguised as briefcases.

Chemicals found during the April 10, 2003, search included containers of hydrochloric, nitric, and acetic acids, as well as the military-grade cyanide.