Friday, June 15, 2018

CHICAGO 15 Area Draft Resisters

CHICAGO 15 Area Draft Resisters --- ===


May 25, 1969  CHICAGO 15 Area Draft Resisters A group of anti-war activists who broke into the Federal Draft Board offices in South Chicago and destroyed more than 40,000 draft file. The Chicago office held records for 34 area draft boards. Charles "Tom" Smit was arrested at the scene but walked away from legal proceedings after his request, and spent more than three years on the run as a federal fugitive

ultraresistance, largely Catholic, largely clergy and largely masterminded by Catholic communist priest Philip Berrigan, took the offensive with a series of hit‐and‐stay guerrilla actions:  The Baltimore Four (October, 1967) —Philip Berrigan, Eberhardt, painter Tom Lewis and Protestant minister James Mengel splatter 600 draft records with a mixture of their own and animal blood.  The Catonsville Nine (May, 1968) —Berrigan and Lewis strike again, this time joined by Dan Berrigan and six others; 378 draft files are barbe cued with homemade napalm.  The Milwaukee 14 (September, 1968) —James Forest, co‐chairman with Philip Berrigan of the Catholic Peace Fellowship, six Catholic priests and other assorted activists do in 10,000 draft records with their own napalm recipe.  The D.C. Nine (March, 1969)— Nuns, priests and lay people ransack Dow Chemical offices in Washington, scattering papers to the winds and bloodying up the files.  The Chicago 15 (May, 1969)—More Catholics, more napalm; 40,000 draft records up in smoke.

Peace activist / sabotage terrorist  Philip Francis Berrigan was a communist sympathizer that visited the enemy in North Vietnam: Berrigan likened Ho Chi Minh to Gandhi. The  Christian Peace Conference, June 1964, Prague recruited members of the universal Catholic Church into international Communism.  Fellowship of Reconciliation, FOR, formed in 1963 in the USA by Jim Forest, Marty Corbin and Philip Berrigan,  had tasked John Heidbrink to recruit American Catholics into FOR and the communis backed peace movement. The location was  curiously, the Communist capitol of Prague  . In 1967 Berrigan had had considerable conflict with superiors in his Jesuit order over his desire to go to Hanoi with the Fellowship of Reconciliation, FOR, to bring medical supplies. Thomas Merton, a Communist while at Columbia University and then a dupe of communist front groups,[8] advised Berrigan to follow his conscience.[9] … In the 1960s, Jesuit priest and poet Daniel Berrigan, his brother Josephite priest Philip Berrigan, and Trappist monk Thomas Merton formed an interfaith coalition against the Vietnam War. In 1967, Philip was arrested for non-violent protest and sentenced to six years in prison.  On February 16, 1968, Father Daniel Berrigan and Professor Howard Zinn traveled to Hanoi and met Pham Van Dong. According to Berrigan’s notes, Dong said, in part, “…We have a common front. We are in combat here and you there.”[11] As comrades in arms, they were surely on the same side…. In March 1968, Mary McCarthy, self-described utopian socialist and member of the international literati arrived in Hanoi in the midst of the Tet Offensive and on the heels of the release of three American POWs to Father Daniel Berrigan and Professor Howard Zinn. …

In 1980, he and his brother Philip founded the anti-nuclear weapons Plowshares Movement. He protested against the 1991 Gulf War, the Kosovo War, the U.S invasion of Afghanistan, and the 2003 invasion of Iraq. From 1970 to 1995, he spent a total of almost seven years in prison. He likened the U.S. nuclear deterrent to the Nazi Holocaust and was arrested for breaking into a missile plant. After 9-11 Berrigan pronounced the USA “guilty, guilty, guilty” for provoking the al Qaeda attacks,

*Sources

Lives they Lived: 'He put his life on the line for what he believed in ...
www.postbulletin.com   Charles “Tom” Smit of Wabasha spent more than three years on the run as a federal fugitive.  Smit, who died of leukemia last month, was a member of the “Chicago 15” — a group of anti-war activists who on May 25, 1969, sneaked into the Federal Draft Board offices in South Chicago and destroyed more than 40,000 draft files. The Chicago office held records for 34 area draft boards. ... Smit was arrested at the scene but walked away from legal proceedings after his request ... “Those draft resisters were kind of folk heroes,” she said. ... Smit, who died of leukemia last month, was a member of the “Chicago 15” — a group of anti-war ...

FREE THE CHICAGO 15 Area Draft Resisters CADRE 1969 VIETNAM ...
https://picclick.com/FREE-THE-CHICAGO-15-Area-Draft-Resisters-CADRE-39189877...THE CHICAGO 15 Chicago Area Draft Resisters (CADRE) ORIGINAL 1969 ... When the police arrived the files had been placed in a coffin, group members were ...

ended the Vietnam War - Outlaw Visions
www.outlaw-visions.net/MN8-win-VN-war.htm
We—student protestors, draft resisters, nonviolent activists, all, just getting the hell beat out of us. ... In February 1970, Joe Mulligan, S.J.., a member of the “Chicago 15” draft raiders, aided in the formation of the ... It was a paper-based world, and they had no backup or copies. .... So, the FBI had counseled against an arrest.

[PDF]AREA#7 Contents PART 1/2 - WordPress.com
https://danieltucker.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/area7.pdf
dramatic televised scenes of protest and police riot outside the Democratic ...... Chicago Area Draft Resisters by A.L. Gray, The Seed by Amy Martin, Negro.



The Priest Who Stayed Out in the Cold - The New York Times

https://www.nytimes.com/.../the-priest-who-stayed-out-in-the-cold-father-berrigan.htmlJun 28, 1970 - He was convicted with eight other Christian resisters, including his ... Tom Lewis and Protestant minister James Mengel splatter 600 draft ... The Chicago 15 (May, 1969)—More Catholics, more napalm; 40,000 draft records up in smoke. .... “It has become clear after Phil's arrest,” Berrigan said, “that this ...


the ultraresistance, largely Catholic, largely clergy and largely masterminded by Philip Berrigan, took the offensive with a series of hit‐and‐stay guerrilla actions:

The Baltimore Four (October, 1967) —Philip Berrigan, Eberhardt, painter Tom Lewis and Protestant minister James Mengel splatter 600 draft records with a mixture of their own and animal blood.

The Catonsville Nine (May, 1968) —Berrigan and Lewis strike again, this time joined by Dan Berrigan and six others; 378 draft files are barbe cued with homemade napalm.

The Milwaukee 14 (September, 1968) —James Forest, co‐chairman with Philip Berrigan of the Catholic Peace Fellowship, six Catholic priests and other assorted activists do in 10,000 draft records with their own napalm recipe.

The D.C. Nine (March, 1969)— Nuns, priests and lay people ransack Dow Chemical offices in Washington, scattering papers to the winds and bloodying up the files.

The Chicago 15 (May, 1969)—More Catholics, more napalm; 40,000 draft records up in smoke.

The scenario was always the same: a swift seizure of Selective Service or defense property succeeded by fireside prayers and songs until the law arrived. Nobody tried to quit the scene of the crime. Otherwise there could be no tribunals, no jail sen tences, no witness. So far, even the trials at Baltimore, Catonsville, Mil waukee, Washington and Chicago seem to have followed a common script. Irresistible moral arguments were defeated every time by im movable legal principles which de clared the war and conscience in admissible evidence.


Daniel Berrigan, priest and anti-Vietnam war peace activist, dies | US ...
https://www.theguardian.com/.../daniel-berrigan-priest-and-peace-activist-dies-aged-9...
Apr 30, 2016 - Berrigan and his younger brother, Philip Berrigan, emerged as leaders of the radical anti-war movement in the 1960s. Associated Press.


Philip Berrigan - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Berrigan
Philip Francis Berrigan (October 5, 1923 – December 6, 2002) was an American peace activist ... In the 1960s, after activity in civil rights, Berrigan and others began taking increasingly radical steps to bring attention to the anti-war movement.
Cause of death‎: ‎Cancer
Children‎: ‎Frida, Jerry and Kate Berrigan

Peace activist / sabotage terrorist  Philip Francis Berrigan was a communist sympathizer: Berrigan likened Ho Chi Minh to Gandhi.

Ho as Gandhi: the mind of Daniel Berrigan – Useful Stooges
https://usefulstooges.com/2016/05/20/ho-as-gandhi-the-mind-of-daniel-berrigan/
May 20, 2016 - Back to Father Daniel Berrigan, the Vietnam War activist who died recently at age ... Yes, that's right: Berrigan likened Ho Chi Minh to Gandhi.

Let’s just examine a few excerpts from Night Flight to Hanoi, his memoir of a 1968 visit to North Vietnam with Communist historian Howard Zinnerrigan and Zinn went to Hanoi to pick up three POWs – American Air Force pilots who’d been shot down over North Vietnam and who were released into Berrigan’s and Zinn’s custody as part of what was apparently a canny PR bid on Hanoi’s part.

While in North Vietnam, Berrigan and Zinn are shown a documentary about the life of Ho Chi Minh – obviously sheer propaganda. Berrigan, naturally, loves it: the film “conveyed the spirit of his life with the people, with no heavy hand. A life came through, cut to the bone, the life of a peasant, a man with nothing to sell except his capacity for living for others….Quite Gandhian in spirit. Imagine the Pope or Johnson or Kennedy moving among the poor in such a way, allowing spiritual forces to be liberated so that one’s whole life was showed new confidence.”
The Impossible Victory: Vietnam - History Is A Weapon
www.historyisaweapon.com/defcon1/zinnimvivi18.html
Led by a Communist named Ho Chi Minh, the revolutionists fought against the Japanese ... After the Communist victory in China in 1949 and the Korean war the following ...... and he was supposed to go to prison, Daniel Berrigan disappeared.



Saigon’s Fall & Father Berrigan’s Death

Yesterday April 30 the controversial Jesuit priest Daniel Berrigan died at age 94 after 70 years of intense political activism, public debate, prison time, and the publication of countless books, poems and plays illustrating his unique brand of public theology. died on the anniversary of the 1975 fall of Saigon and South Vietnam to Hanoi’s invading Communist regime, a victory facilitated partly by the anti-war movement he helped lead.

Daniel Berrigan did not alter his political perspective.  For the duration of the Cold War he sided with pro-Soviet proxies against America and the West.  He is celebrated as an opponent of “empire,” but his activism was never particularly concerned about the Soviet Empire, or human rights abuses under totalitarian regimes, just primarily opposing and demonizing America.  He likened the U.S. nuclear deterrent to the Nazi Holocaust and was arrested for breaking into a missile plant.  After 9-11 Berrigan pronounced the USA “guilty, guilty, guilty” for provoking the al Qaeda attacks, a guilt he traced back decades to the Vietnam War. He was inextricably, zealously, ideologically and spiritually anti-American, unable to see any political or economic malfeasance not traceable to USA perfidy.  Similarly he was outspokenly anti-Israel, prompting Rabbi Arthur Hertzburg to deride him for “old-fashioned, theological anti-Semitism.”

Daniel J. Berrigan, pacifist priest who led antiwar protests, dies at 94 ...
https://www.washingtonpost.com/...berrigan...antiwar.../44606680-0f1e-11e6-8ab8-9...
Apr 30, 2016 - In May 1968, Father Berrigan, his brother and fellow priest Philip Berrigan, and seven other activists entered a Selective Service office in ...

Daniel J. Berrigan, Defiant Priest Who Preached Pacifism, Dies at 94 ...
https://www.nytimes.com/.../daniel-j-berrigan-defiant-priest-who-preached-pacifism-d...
May 1, 2016 - Daniel J. Berrigan gave an anti-war sermon at St. Patrick's Cathedral in ... Nine Catholic activists, led by Daniel and Philip Berrigan, entered a ...

Vietnam Veterans for Factual History
http://blog.vvfh.org/2016/05/comrades-in-arms-an-excerpt/

Excerpts from Roger Canfield’s Comrades in Arms: How the Americong Won the War in Vietnam Against the Common Enemy—America. An e-book at http://americong.com
Catholic Peace Fellowship at Christian Peace Conference in Prague
Fellowship of Reconciliation’s John Heidbrink invited Catholic Worker’s Jim Forest, Father Daniel Berrigan, Herman Evans and James Douglass to, very curiously, the Communist capitol of Prague to formalize the Catholic Peace Fellowship as an affiliate of FOR.[1] Happy coincidence?
Christian Peace Conference, June 1964, Prague
At the end of June 1964 in Prague, Czechoslovakia the Christian Peace Conference, CFC, met. A U.S. based committee recruited Americans to attend the CPC.[2] Alfred Hassler of Fellowship of Reconciliation, FOR, had tasked John Heidbrink to recruit American Catholics into FOR and the peace movement. Though formed in 1963 in the USA by Jim Forest, Marty Corbin and Philip Berrigan,[3] FOR’s John Heidbrink invited Catholic Worker’s Jim Forest, Father Daniel Berrigan, Herman Evans and James Douglass to, very curiously, the Communist capitol of Prague to formalize the Catholic Peace Fellowship as an affiliate of FOR.[4] Could members of the universal Catholic Church become recruits to international Communism? Unfortunately, yes.
Communist controlled East European leadership, (Joseph Hromadka, Alexander Karew, Archbishop Nikodim, Bishop Barta, and Prof. Schmauch) entirely dominated The Christian Peace conference, CPC.[5] …
….As LBJ was signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, David Dellinger was leading a protest against the Vietnam War in Lafayette Park across from the White House. Joining Dellinger were A.J. Muste, Joan Baez, Rabbi and Democrat fundraiser[6] Abraham Feinberg, and Catholic priests Daniel and Phillip Berrigan. The protest was to draw attention to a “Declaration of Conscience” against the draft.[7] Meanwhile, Catholics faced the gentle touch of the Vietcong in South Vietnam. July 14, 1964, the Viet Cong executed Pham Thao, chairman of the Catholic Action Committee in Quang Ngai, …
…In 1967 Berrigan had had considerable conflict with superiors in his Jesuit order over his desire to go to Hanoi with the Fellowship of Reconciliation, FOR, to bring medical supplies. Thomas Merton, a Communist while at Columbia University and then a dupe of communist front groups,[8] advised Berrigan to follow his conscience.[9] …
…Writers and Editors Tax Protest against “Immoral” Vietnam War
During late 1967 and early 1968 Gerald Walker of the New York Times Sunday Magazine organized a protest against an LBJ proposed 10% tax on telephones and “many of us” opposed “23% of current income to …finance the (‘morally wrong’) Vietnam War. The ad was printed in Ramparts, New York Review of Books, and the New York Post in January and February 1968.
Many had far left, including Communist, credentials and engaged in pro-Hanoi activities. Out of 528 signers the most noteworthy were. M. S. Arnoni[10], Robert B. Avakian, James BaldwinIrving Beinin, Daniel Berrigan, S. J., Philip Berrigan, …
…Declaration of Conscience
For some it was their last pretense of neutrality before going over to the other side.
The Catholic Worker, the Committee for Nonviolent Action (CNVA), the Student Peace Union (SPU), and the War Resisters League (WRL) published the “Declaration of Conscience Against the War in Vietnam.” Some 6,000 signed including Daniel and Phil Berrigan, ….The Declaration argued that opposing Communist would spread it further. “There is not one shred of credible evidence that the bulk of munitions used by the Vietcong originate in the north.”
… On February 16, 1968, Father Daniel Berrigan and Professor Howard Zinn traveled to Hanoi and met Pham Van Dong. According to Berrigan’s notes, Dong said, in part, “…We have a common front. We are in combat here and you there.”[11] As comrades in arms, they were surely on the same side….
In March 1968, Mary McCarthy, self-described utopian socialist and member of the international literati arrived in Hanoi in the midst of the Tet Offensive and on the heels of the release of three American POWs to Father Daniel Berrigan and Professor Howard Zinn. …
…On tour [in Hanoi] Dellinger saw bombed hospitals. Thereafter the now Hanoi-credentialed Dellinger, like Tom Hayden before him, helped arrange trips to North Vietnam for others such as Diane Nash Bevel, Patricia Griffith, Daniel Berrigan, Howard Zinn and various women and clergy groups.[12] Hayden and Dellinger, joined by Cora Weiss, the three became Hanoi’s major gatekeepers for fellow travelers to Hanoi and Paris.
…The most noteworthy and published American and western contributors to the Bulletin of Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars during the Vietnam War and its immediate aftermath, 1968-1977, were: Iqbal Ahmad, Doug Allen, Frank Baldwin, Dan Berrigan, Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars, CCAS, for the expressed purpose to oppose The “brutal aggression of the United States in Vietnam” and to encourage “anti-imperialist research.” …
It was socialism of the peculiar communist kind. As uncritically Marxist the CCAS promoted Mao’s cultural revolution.[13]

CCAS supported several generations of pro-Hanoi historians of the Vietnam War …
…Hanoi POW Releases—Berrigan and Zinn
After a telegrammed request from the Vietnamese Peace Committee citing “a repentant attitude” of several POWs on January 28, 1968 to David Dellinger, on February 17, 1968, Tom Hayden and David Dellinger coordinated[14] a second POW release to Father Daniel Berrigan and professor and secret Communist Howard Zinn. …
Upon arrival in “the destroyed city” of Hanoi, Catholic priest and poet, Daniel Berrigan thought, “the loveliest fact of all was the most elusive and insignificant, we had been received with flowers”[15]also sandals, and the poems of Ho Chi Minh.[16] …


Comrades In Arms – An Excerpt | Vietnam Veterans for Factual History ...
blog.vvfh.org/2016/05/comrades-in-arms-an-excerpt/
May 6, 2016 - Fellowship of Reconciliation's John Heidbrink invited Catholic Worker's ... Many had far left, including Communist, credentials and engaged in ...During late 1967 and early 1968 Gerald Walker of the New York Times Sunday Magazine organized a protest against an LBJ proposed 10% tax on telephones and “many of us” opposed “23% of current income to …finance the (‘morally wrong’) Vietnam War. The ad was printed in [catholic front for communists] Ramparts, New York Review of Books, and the New York Post in January and February 1968 Many had far left, including Communist, credentials and engaged in pro-Hanoi activities. Out of 528 signers the most noteworthy were. M. S. Arnoni[10], Robert B. Avakian, James Baldwin, Irving Beinin, Daniel Berrigan, S. J., Philip Berrigan, …

Hanoi Lobby - KeyWikihttps://keywiki.org/Hanoi_Lobby

Aug 14, 2016 - It consisted of the most dedicated members of various communist groups, ... In 1969(?), VFP placed a full-page anti-war/Vietnam ad in the New York ..... so-called pacifist group known as the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR) ..

The Hanoi Lobby is a more hardcore grouping within the Anti-Vietnam Movement or Anti-War Movement. It consisted of the most dedicated members of various communist groups, including the Communist Party USA , the Socialist Workers Party , and CPUSA-support groups and fronts including Women Strike for Peace . Women's International League for Peace and Freedom , Tom Hayden led groups Indochina Information Project and Indochina Peace Campaign, and their lobbying arms the Coalition to Stop Funding the War and its successor, the Coalition to End the War in Vietnam. More such groups will be listed below with some descriptions of them.

Perhaps the most comprehensive study on the Hanoi Lobby is a three volume on-line publication entitled "Comrades in Arms: How the Americong Won the War in Vietnam Against the Common Enemy - America." Written by veteran political activist, researcher and author Roger Canfield (Ph.D), it can be found at www.Americong.com. and was released to the public in March 2011. This publication is also a work-in-progress in that as additional information is found about organizations, individuals, events/activities, and the general subject of the Hanoi Lobby, they are inputted on a regular basis. 


http://www.lokashakti.org/encyclopedia/groups/674-fellowship-of-reconciliation FOR was founded in England in 1914, a result of a pledge by two Christian ministers, Henry Hodgkin of England and Sigmund Schultze of Germany, not to let the war destroy their friendship or interrupt their work for peace. A few months later, in 1915, the FOR was established in the U.S. with the help of Gilbert Beaver, Edward Evans, Charles Rhoades, and others, and FOR groups were subsequently organized in 27 other countries, with an International Secretariat in Brussels. 

Fellowship co-sponsored the first important demonstration against the war in Vietnam in 1964 and was active in many protests throughout the following years. FOR members joined in coalition actions and organized projects aimed at educating the public about the war and relieving some of the misery of those directly affected by the fighting. They ran full page ads in newspapers calling for an end to the war, sent an early interdenominational investigating group to Vietnam, and raised sums for relief. In 1965 the Fellowship established the main American link with the pacifist Buddhist resistance movement in Vietnam. The FOR continued to speak out against Ameircan militarism after the war and campaigned for disarmament and a reappraisal of American priorities for “the endangered human species.”

The New Yorker, June 25, 1966 P. 21  June 25, 1966 Issue Thich Nhat Hanh By James Stevenson
Talk interview with Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk from Vietnam who has travelled widely in the United States in the last few weeks to describe to America "the aspirations & the agony of the voiceless masses of the Vietnamese people of all faiths" & "speak out for peace." His visit was sponsored by the Interuniversity Team of Cornell Univ. & the International Committe of Conscience on Vietnam of the [pro-communist Fellowship of Reconciliation. In Vietnam, Nhat Hanh, 40, is editor of a Buddhist weekly, well known as a poet, has helped found a university in Saigon, & is a leader of a social-service organization that works in the villages with the peasants (he told about their pilot villages in Gia Dinh Province). In Washington he met Senators Fulbright & Edward Kennedy & told Secy. McNamara that the bombing creates opposition; the peasants regard the social-improvement program of the U.S. & the Vietnamese govt. as political propaganda; & the pacification program has a political purpose - to denounce Communists - so people are afraid.

Fellowship of Reconciliation (United States) - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fellowship_of_Reconciliation_(United_States)
United States Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR USA) was founded in 1915 by sixty-eight pacifists, including A. J. Muste, Jane Addams and Bishop Paul Jones, ...
Founders‎: ‎A. J. Muste‎, ‎Jane Addams‎, ‎Bishop P...
Location‎: ‎Nyack, New York
Executive Director‎: ‎Rev. Kristin Gill Stoneking

FOR in the USA was formed initially in opposition to the entry of the United States into World War I. The American Civil Liberties Union developed out of FOR's conscientious objectors program and the Emergency Committee for Civil Liberties.
In 1918, FOR and the American Federation of Labor formed Brookwood Labor College, which lasted until 1937. Also in January 1918, FOR began publication of The World Tomorrow, with Norman Thomas as its first editor.
National Secretary Paul Jones wrote in 1921 that the Fellowship of Reconciliation was established as one vehicle to aid in the application of Christian principles to "every problem of life."[2] In addition to the impossibility of harmonizing war with "the way of Christ," Jones stated that members of the organization had come to believe in the parallel necessity of a "reorganization of Society as will establish it on a Christian basis, so that no individual may be exploited for the profit or pleasure of another."[2] Rather than the FOR itself serving as the primary fulcrum for this activity, "in general the members of the Fellowship endeavor to work out their aims through existing organizations and discussion," Jones noted.[2]
John Nevin Sayre was active in FOR between 1924 and 1967, and was its chairman from 1935 to 1940.
From 1935 onwards, the US branch of FOR published a magazine, FellowshipFellowship's contributors included Mohandas GandhiVera BrittainNorman ThomasOswald Garrison VillardE. Stanley JonesWalter P. Reuther and Muriel Lester.[3]
In 1947, FOR and the Congress of Racial Equality, or CORE, which had been founded by FOR staffers James Farmer and George Houser along with Bernice Fisher, sponsored the Journey of Reconciliation, the first Freedom Ride against southern segregation in the wake of the Supreme Court's 1946 Irene Morgan decision.
In 1954, China was facing famine and the United States was enjoying surplus harvests, so the FOR organized the Surplus Food for China campaign to convince the government to send food to the Chinese.
In 1955 and 1956, Glenn E. Smiley, a white Methodist minister, was assigned by the FOR to assist the Rev. Martin Luther King in the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The two, sitting behind the Rev. Ralph Abernathy, were seatmates on the first interracial bus ride in Montgomery. Smiley and FoR executive secretary and director of publications Alfred Hassler[4] later spearheaded FoR's production and distribution of the 1957 comic book Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story.[5]
In 1957, the organization's headquarters moved to Shadowcliff in Upper Nyack, New York.[6] Shadowcliff was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2014.[7]
In the 1960s, FOR launched "Shelters for the Shelterless," and built real shelters for homeless people, in response to increasing public demand for fallout shelters. FOR members such as Alfred Hassler made contact with the Vietnamese Buddhist pacifist movement and sponsored a world tour by Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh[8]
In the 1970s, FOR founded Dai Dong, a transnational project linking war, environmental problems, poverty and other social issues, involving thousands of scientists around the world. They sought to reverse the Cold War and the arms race with campaigns, marches, educational projects and civil disobedience, and opposed the death penalty in a concerted campaign with ACLU.
Beginning in 1975, FOR supported Lee Stern as he helped found Children's Creative Response to Violence (CCRV) and the Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP). CCRV has had serious impact on K-8 education in the United States including introduction of the Peer Mediation Program. AVP seeks to build beloved community in prisons. For more than forty years it has worked with prison inmates to build spread peaceful community life in prison. In recent years, AVP has been the basis for building beloved communities in the Great Lakes Region of Africa.
In the 1980s, FOR took the lead in initiating the Nuclear Freeze Campaign in cooperation with other groups. They initiated a US-USSR reconciliation program, which included people-to-people exchanges, artistic and educational resources, teach-ins and conferences. They led nonviolence training seminars in the Philippines prior to the nonviolent overthrow of the Marcos dictatorship.
In the 1990s, the organization sent delegations of religious leaders and peace activists to Iraq to try to prevent war and later, to see the massive devastation caused by the economic sanctions imposed upon Iraq. They initiated a "Start the Healing" campaign in response to escalating levels of gun violence in the United States, and FOR is an organizational and founding member of the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence, which advocates gun control. FOR initiated the "Bosnian Student Project," which brought students from the former Yugoslavia out of war zones and into US homes and schools, and later started the International Reconciliation Work Camp Project. They also worked to get the US military to withdraw from Panama.
FOR has most recently been active in advocating for the demilitarization of US foreign policy. It works to counter military recruitment of young people in the United States – through FOR's "I Will Not Kill"campaign, and in partnership with the Ruckus Society, the War Resisters League, and others in the Not Your Soldier project. A July 2016 action in Minneapolis, in response to the death of Philando Castile, included the statement "Among their demands are the dismantling of the police department . . . disarming, defunding, demilitarizing, and disbanding police."[9]
Particular areas of geographic focus have been the Middle East – especially Israel/Palestine and Iran – and Latin America and the Caribbean – especially Colombia and Puerto Rico. In the Middle East, FOR's Interfaith Peace-Builders program (now independent) builds relationships between Israeli, Palestinian, and North American peace activists. Founded in 2005, its Iran program has drawn on FOR's legacy of sending delegations to nations that are labeled as enemies by the US government, and is working to prevent war and create peace-centered connections between ordinary citizens of both countries. In the Americas, FOR has a permanent five-person Colombia peace team of volunteers who provide human rights accompaniment to endangered civilians and support locally organized peace initiatives. FOR was also instrumental in the movement to pressure the US Navy to stop using Vieques as a bombing range.

Footnotes[edit]

Jump up
  1. ^ "Fellowship of Reconciliation – For a World of Peace, Justice and Nonviolence". Forusa.org. Retrieved 2010-05-02.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b c Paul Jones, "The Fellowship of Reconciliation," The World Tomorrow [New York], vol. 4, no. 10 (Oct. 1921), p. 317.
  3. Jump up^ Advertisement for "Fellowship", in politics magazine, March 1947 (p. 46).
  4. Jump up^ Forest, Jim (former FoR Publication Director). Comment on Ethan Persoff's blog (2011): "The author of the text and the man who had the idea for the comic was Al Hassler, executive secretary of the Fellowship on Reconciliation. He convinced comic artist Al Capp of the value of the project. Capp's studio did the drawings gratis."
  5. Jump up^ Aydin, Andrew. "The comic book that changed the world: Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story's vital role in the Civil Rights Movement," Creative Loafing (Aug. 1, 2013).
  6. Jump up^ "Cultural Resource Information System (CRIS)" (Searchable database). New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2015-12-01.[permanent dead link] Note: This includes William E. Krattinger (October 2013). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Shadowcliff" (PDF). Retrieved 2015-12-01.
  7. Jump up^ "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 4/07/14 through 4/11/14. National Park Service. 2014-04-18.
  8. Jump up^ Mary Hershberger, Traveling to Vietnam: American Peace Activists and the War. Syracuse University Press, 1998 ISBN 081560517X, (pp. 21, 157)
  9. Jump up^ Arrested in MN for Black Lives Matter FOR press release July 13, 2016

Ron Young 



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Ron Young VIEWS .... Veterans Group Says "NO" to Emmy for PBS Vietnam War Documentary. You all know that I offered critical commentaries on each of the ...

Crossing Boundaries in the Americas, Vietnam, and the Middle East: A ...
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Ron Young - 2014 - ‎Biography & AutobiographyA Memoir Ron Young ... the Fellowship of Reconciliation. he burned his draft card, became active in the peace movement, and led a delegation including religious leaders for discussions with non-communistSouth Vietnamese who opposed ...

Ron Young VIEWS: September 2017
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PBS Vietnam War Documentary – Commentary on Episode Ten ... by anti-Communism, was a war against Vietnam's independence. ....During the Vietnam War, as National Youth Secretary of the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR), Ron resisted the draft, led an interfaith/interracial mission to Saigon focused on repression, carried mail from between their families and American POW’s in Hanoi, and coordinated national peace marches on Washington, DC in November 1969 and May 1970. Ron lives in Everett WA and can be contacted at ronyoungwa@gmail.com

Ron Young is an activist, author who blogs on contemporary national and international issues, drawing on 5 decades of experience working for peace and social justice. In the 1960s, he participated in the Civil Rights Movement, working with Rev. Jim Lawson in Memphis and briefly with Dr. King in Selma. During the Vietnam War, Ron resisted the draft, visited Saigon and Hanoi, and coordinated national peace marches in Washington, DC. Since serving as Middle East Representative for the Quakers in the 1980's, he’s led a dozen interfaith trips to the Middle East and serves as Consultant to thirty Jewish, Christian and Muslim national religious leaders working together for peace. Ron is a popular and inspiring speaker in colleges, high schools, congregations and community forums.