Monday, December 23, 2013

North Korean Poison Attacks

North Korean Poison Attacks ---
Terroristic Security Incidents by Category |Timeline

Can this explain attacks on Koreans and Americans by Koreans in the US?

1 killed suspect arrested August 21, 2011 Missionary Kim Chang-hwan dies from suicide poison or suspected North Korean poison needle attack South Korean missionary meets a stranger who turns out to be North Korean agent assigned to monitor him. He was  in Dandong, a Chinese city on the Yalu River overlooking North Korea. He suddenly had a discolored complexion, spots on his fingers and limbs, flecks of foam on his mouth. He was dead by the time he reached the hospital. Chinese hospital officials said Kim Chang-hwan had committed suicide by swallowing pesticides, but after his wife brought back her own blood sample, it was tested in Seoul found high levels of a poison. Experts know that the poison needle has been in use by North Korean special operations against activists, often evangelical Christians who smuggle out defectors and send anti-Kim literature and Bibles across the border sometimes on balloons.  December 2012 it was established that in March 2010 a North Korean agent was assigned to monitor  Kim. He pretended to be a defector, and investigation confirmed that Kim was killed using neostigmine bromide, known to be preferred by North Korean intelligence agents.

One of 3 plots: 

August 21, 2011 Patrick Kim collapsed at a taxi stand in a city in China near North Korea, the apparent victim of a poison needle. He was a Christian pastor and human rights activist who helped people escape North Korea. The next day in another Chinese city, another South Korean missionary also fell but survived the attack. In mid-September, another man was arrested planning a similar plot.

*Sources 

August 12, 2011 South Korean Mission Worker Collapsed After Suspected NKorean Pinprick in Back in China A day after attack on missionary in an other Chinese city, Yanji, a South Korean involved with missionary work was standing at an intersection when he felt a pinprick in his lower back. As he collapsed, he heard a man muttering behind him in Chinese, "Sorry, sorry." He survived the attack. latimes


1 killed suspect arrested August 11, 2011 Missionary Kim Chang-hwan dies from suicide poison or suspected North Korean poison needle attack South Korean missionary meets a stranger who turns out to be North Korean agent assigned to monitor him. He was  in Dandong, a Chinese city on the Yalu River overlooking North Korea. He suddenly had a discolored complexion, spots on his fingers and limbs, flecks of foam on his mouth. He was dead by the time he reached the hospital. Chinese hospital officials said Kim Chang-hwan had committed suicide by swallowing pesticides, but after his wife brought back her own blood sample, it was tested in Seoul found high levels of a poison. Experts know that the poison needle has been in use by North Korean special operations against activists, often evangelical Christians who smuggle out defectors and send anti-Kim literature and Bibles across the border sometimes on balloons.  December 2012 it was established that in March 2010 a North Korean agent was assigned to monitor  Kim. He pretended to be a defector, and investigation confirmed that Kim was killed using neostigmine bromide, known to be preferred by North Korean intelligence agents.

North Korea suspected in Patrick Kim among 3 poison-needle attacks - latimes
Los Angeles Times  Oct 9, 2011 - And his family and South Korean diplomats believe he was killed by ...Yanji, a South Korean involved with missionary work was standing at an ... On a Sunday evening in August, a middle-aged South Korean pastor collapsed suddenly near a taxi stand in Dandong, a Chinese city on the Yalu River overlooking North Korea. The 46-year-old, who used the name Patrick Kim, had a discolored complexion, spots on his fingers and limbs, flecks of foam on his mouth. He was dead by the time he reached the hospital. "The poison needle has been in use by North Korean special operations for a long time." activists, many of them evangelical Christians, not only smuggle out defectors but also send anti-Kim literature and Bibles across the border, sometimes by attaching them to balloons that float across the demilitarized zone between the two nations. Patrick Kim's death, on Aug. 21, was the first of three attacks or plots that South Korean activists or officials believe were carried out by North Korea.  Then, in mid-September, South Korean intelligence announced that it had arrested a North Korean defector on charges that he had planned a similar attack in Seoul. The target in that case was Park Sung-hak,  Mar 5, 2013 Was a South Korean missionary murdered by the North ... www.cnn.com/2013/03/04/world/.../south-korea-missionary-death/
  • Kim Ha-young believes her husband was murdered for helping North Koreans to defect
  • Her husband, Kim Chang-hwan, was found dead in a Chinese town across the North Korean border
  • Hospital officials said Kim Chang-hwan had committed suicide by swallowing pesticides
  • A blood sample tested in Seoul found high levels of a poison to kill a person
CNN - Was a South Korean missionary murdered by the North? ... A blood sample tested in Seoul found high levels of a poison to kill a person. ...two years since she found her husband, Kim Chang-hwan, foaming at the mouth in the Chinese city of Dandong on the North Korean border. The 46-year-old father of two had been working as a missionary, helping North Korean defectors escape across the border. Kim Ha-young was living in the border city as well, helping her husband. She had just spoken to her husband 15 minutes earlier. "He told me he was meeting a North Korean defector and would then come home. A short time later I got a call from one of his colleagues who said (my husband) collapsed on the street and he told me to rush to the hospital," she said. "When I got there he was dead." Hospital officials said Kim Chang-hwan had committed suicide by swallowing pesticides. His wife believes he was killed by a North Korean agent. did not accept govt explanation... he went to the morgue before his body was cremated and collected samples of his blood on a glove and gave them to South Korean authorities on her return to Seoul. The government report on that blood sample, reviewed by CNN, revealed levels of poison high enough to kill a person instantly... One man was arrested on espionage charges in connection to the murder and sentenced to four years in prison,
www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/.../116_126431.html
The Korea TimesDec 7, 2012 - Until his death in August last year, the 46-year-old missionary, Kim Chang-hwan, served as a Christian evangelist to North Korean residents ...


'Missionary poisoned by NK agent' - The Korea Times www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/.../116_126431.html
The Korea TimesDec 7, 2012 - The death of a South Korean missionary in China last year, initially reported as due to an unknown cause, was caused by a poison used by ... 46-year-old missionary, Kim Chang-hwan, served as a Christian evangelist to North Korean residents and defectors in Dandong, China. He was trying to catch a taxi in front of a department store in the Chinese city but suddenly fell down foaming at the mouth. He was taken to a hospital but died hours later. Kim's corpse was covered in bruises and rashes prompting his bereaved family and colleagues to suspect foul play in his death. They claimed it was highly likely that professional assassins with possible links agents to North Korea attacked him with a poisoned needle or some other method. An autopsy, however, did not find any toxic chemicals or evidence of murder. The family cremated the body about 10 days after the death.  court ruling, in March 2010 the North Korean agent was ordered to keep an eye on Kim who was helping North Koreans defect to the South. The agent in question contacted Kim by pretending to be a defector, and reported Kim's activities to the North's intelligence agency. In the ruling, the court said, "Based on the investigation report from the prosecution, we confirmed that Kim was killed using neostigmine bromide, the poison used by North Korean intelligence agents  toxicity of neostigmine bromide is five times stronger than potassium cyanide. A small dose of the chemical can cause apnea and a heart attack.
North Korean secret agents against the missionaries in China
vaticaninsider.lastampa.it/.../corea-del-nord-north-korea-norco...
La StampaSep 14, 2011 - That is that North Korean agents had tried to kill him. How? With a needle dipped in poison. A weapon which fans ofdetective stories will ...


September 2011 North Korean agent arrested trying to kill anti-Pyonyang activist North Korean agent, arrested in October last year for attempting to kill anti-Pyongyang activist Park Sang-hak, had needles with the same chemical poison.  Park Sang-hak - Wikipedia democracy activist and is the chairman of Fighters for a Free North Korea Park Sang-hak: The man trying to liberate North Korea using balloons ... independent.co.uk Assassination attempt Wikipedia  In September 2011, a North Korean defector was arrested in Seoul by members of the National Intelligence Service on his way to meet with Park, referred to as "Enemy Zero" by the Pyongyang regime. South Korean authorities said that he had planned to kill Park either by poisoning his drink or by jabbing him with a poisoned needle. Park said that the assassin, Ahn, had phoned him earlier and asked to meet him. "Ahn told me by phone", Park said, "that he was to be accompanied by a visitor from Japan who wants to help our efforts. But then I was told by the NIS not to go to the meeting due to the risk of assassination" The Independent of London noted that Ahn "could face the death penalty" under South Korea's National Security Law, but he ended up being sentenced to four years in prison. He was also ordered to pay 11.75 million Won in fines, which was the same amount he had been promised for assassinating Park. The Independent also pointed out that the assassination plot was “reminiscent of the KGB Cold War killing of Bulgarian dissident Georgi Markov, who was stabbed with a ricin-tipped umbrella in London in 1978.”




Poison pen is mightier than the sword for North Korea's assassins ...
www.independent.co.uk › NewsWorldAsia

Nov 26, 2012 - The first weapon looks like an innocuous electric torch, except it is able to fire three bullets. The second is a ballpoint pen with a poisoned ...

http://articles.latimes.com/2011/oct/09/world/la-fg-north-korea-poison-20111010

On a Sunday evening in August, a middle-aged South Korean pastor collapsed suddenly near a taxi stand in Dandong,.. The 46-year-old, who used the name Patrick Kim, had a discolored complexion, spots on his fingers and limbs, flecks of foam on his mouth. He was dead by the time he reached the hospital.pastor was a human rights activist who secretly helped people slip out of North Korea into China. And his family and South Korean diplomats believe he was killed by North Korean agents in retaliation. The weapon of choice: most likely a poisoned needle.... many of them evangelical Christians, not only smuggle out defectors but also send anti-Kim literature and Bibles across the border,

death, on Aug. 21, was the first of three attacks or plots that South Korean activists or officials believe were carried out by North Korea. A day later in another Chinese city, Yanji, a South Korean involved with missionary work was standing at an intersection when he felt a pinprick in his lower back. As he collapsed, he heard a man muttering behind him in Chinese, "Sorry, sorry." He survived the attack.

Then, in mid-September, South Korean intelligence announced that it had arrested a North Korean defector on charges that he had planned a similar attack in..


the three incidents, coming in rapid succession, point to an increasingly belligerent North Korean security apparatus


Poison-Needle Assassination Plot Busted in South Korea - ABC News

abcnews.go.com › ABC News BlogsHeadlinesWorld
Sep 16, 2011 - It could be a plot out of an action thriller. South Korean officials have arrested a North Korean defector in an alleged poison-needle plot ...